public lecture

Malevich's Nervous System

Briony Fer
University of College London
February 4, 2014
In this lecture, Briony Fer, Professor of History of Art at University College London, will look at Malevich's systemic method, as it was elaborated in his work, writings, and teachings, and its ongoing relevance for subsequent generations of artists. Malevich's late work is examined as an intricate set of reflections on some of the problems raised by the systems that he set in the 1910s.

Art History Lecture Series, Orientations in Renaissance Art

Alexander Nagel
New York University
December 9, 2013
In this lecture, Alexander Nagel, Professor of Fine Arts at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, illustrates some ways in which art produced during the Renaissance period points ­eastward towards Constantinople, towards the Holy Land, and to places further east, even as far as China. Nagel focuses on the forms this "orientation" took between 1492-1507, years during which new lands were being discovered, to great fanfare, but were still believed to belong to the continent of Asia.

Rethinking Barbarian Invasions through Genomic History

Patrick Geary
School of Historical Studies
November 13, 2013
Historians have debated for centuries the magnitude, nature, and impact of population movements from the borders of the Roman Empire into its heart between the fourth and seventh centuries. In recent years, geneticists have begun to attempt to provide clarity to these questions through the analysis of the biological data contained in the human genome.

The Age of Networks

Jennifer Chayes
Distinguished Scientist and Managing Director Microsoft Research New England and New York City
November 8, 2013

In this talk, Jennifer Chayes, Distinguished Scientist and Managing Director of Microsoft Research New England and New York City, looks quite generally at some of the models we are using to describe ­networks, processes we are studying on the networks, ­algorithms we have devised for the networks, and finally, methods we are developing to indirectly infer network structure from measured data. In particular, she discusses models and techniques that cut across many disciplinary boundaries.