public lecture

Lawless Economy? Putin's Russia and the Imperfect Market

Bill Browder
Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Hermitage Capital Management
December 2, 2016
Bill Browder
World Disorder Lecture Series: Lawless Economy?
In this public lecture, Bill Browder, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Hermitage Capital Management, will give a firsthand critical analysis of the Russian economy–—particularly the absence of the rule of law–—laden with insights derived from his personal experience.

The Institute for Advanced Study: The First 100 Years

George Dyson
November 9, 2016
In 1916, social theorist Thorstein Veblen called for the post-war institution of “academic houses of refuge... where teachers and students of all nationalities, including Americans with the rest, may pursue their chosen work.” In 1923, Oswald Veblen contacted Simon Flexner, who suggested “you might speak with my brother, Mr. Abraham Flexner,” thus bringing in Louis Bamberger and Carrie Fuld, whose fortunes had been launched selling distressed merchandise out of a Newark storefront in 1892.

Contesting American Values

Jonathan Israel
Institute for Advanced Study
October 28, 2016
The American Revolution had an enormous, but bitterly divisive impact on European (and Canadian and Latin America) political thought and attitudes. From 1776 began a furious ideological war within the USA over the question of democracy that helped precipitate an even more ferocious conflict between democratic and aristocratic forms of government in Europe. By the 1820s, it seemed that the aristocratic-monarchical system, led by Britain, had finally extinguished "Americanism" everywhere outside the USA.

An Antidote to the Politics of Despair

Deva Woodly
May 13, 2016
Enabling Conceptions of Justice and the Democratic Necessity of Insurgency

Using the work of Iris Young, Amartya Sen, and John Dewey, along with the empirical case of the contemporary Movement for Black Lives, Deva Woodly, Member (2012–13) and Assistant Professor of Politics at The New School, will develop the argument that both the idea of justice and citizens themselves benefit from democratic insurgencies that emerge from ordinary people and challenge prevailing notions about existing arrangements of power and privilege.

Math in the Real World: More Than Just a Numbers Game

Sandi Peterson and Kathy Wengel
May 11, 2016
Mathematics has a vital role in shaping a product’s life, from research & development to manufacturing, and from marketing to supply chain. In this public lecture, Institute Trustee Sandi Peterson and Kathy Wengel, both Princeton alumnae, will explore the importance of mathematics throughout the lifecycle of some of Johnson & Johnson’s best known brands while sharing their experience of the impact of mathematics on the critical success factors of a modern career.

Picasso and Abstraction: Encounters and Avoidance

Yve-Alain Bois
Professor, School of Historical Studies
April 6, 2016
Pablo Picasso did not speak often about abstraction, but when he did, it was either to dismiss it as complacent decoration or to declare its very notion an oxymoron. The root of this hostility is to be found in the impasse that the artist reached in the summer 1910, when abstraction suddenly appeared as the logical development of his previous work, a possibility at which he recoiled in horror. But though he swore to never go again near abstraction, he could not prevent himself from testing his resolve from time to time.

Do We Understand Putin's Russia?

Jonathan Haslam
George F. Kennan Professor in the School of Historical Studies
November 7, 2015
We should not assume that making sense of post-Soviet Russia was ever going to be easy. Great Powers that lose empires bear grudges and the speed with which an empire is lost can exacerbate the problem. No one can expect that a powerful country run by a former secret policeman is going to operate by the same rules of the game to which we are accustomed. Quite simply, what may seem sensible or rational to ourselves is irrelevant. In this public lecture, Jonathan Haslam, George F.