School of Natural Sciences

Science Talk for Families — Richard Schwartz

Richard Schwartz
Chancellor’s Professor of Mathematics, Brown University
October 10, 2015
Richard Schwartz, Member (2003–04) in the School of Mathematics and the Chancellor’s Professor of Mathematics at Brown University, will talk about really large numbers, as well as the different sizes of infinity and the different forms of infinite space. He will illustrate the talk with excerpts from his books, Really Big Numbers, Life on the Infinite Farm, and Gallery of the Infinite. All children and families are welcome. The talk is geared for ages 8 and up.

MINERVA-Red: An Intensive Survey for Planets Orbiting the Nearest Low-mass Stars to the Sun

Cullen Blake
University of Pennsylvania
October 6, 2015
Recent results from Kepler and ground-based exoplanet surveys suggest that low-mass stars are host to numerous small planets. Since low-mass stars are intrinsically faint at optical wavelengths, obtaining the Doppler precision necessary to detect these companions remains a challenge for existing instruments.

Our Mathematical Universe

Max Tegmark
Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
May 8, 2015
In this lecture, Tegmark surveys how humans have repeatedly underestimated not only the size of the cosmos, but also the power of the human mind to understand it using mathematical equations. He explores how mathematics in physics has allowed us to predict Neptune, radio waves, and the Higgs bosons. Tegmark also discusses how we should think of ourselves in a cosmic perspective.

Science Talk for Families- Jo Bovy

Jo Bovy, Member
John N. Bahcall Fellow, School of Natural Sciences
March 7, 2015
Jo Bovy, John N. Bahcall Fellow in the School of Natural Sciences, talks about stars, planets, and gases that make up galaxies, the dark matter that holds them together, and the history of our own Milky Way galaxy in this talk geared for children and families.

Modern Cosmology and the Origin of the Universe

Matias Zaldarriaga
Institute for Advanced Study
February 11, 2015
The last decades have seen great advances
in our understanding of the history of our
universe. I will summarize our current
knowledge, describe some of the puzzles
that still remain and speculate about future
developments in cosmology.
Matias Zaldarriaga has made many influential
and creative contributions to our understanding of the
early universe, particle astrophysics, and cosmology
As a probe of fundamental physics. Much of his work
centers on understanding the clues about the earliest