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Fourier Spectrum of Polynomials Over Finite Fields

Shachar Lovett
Institute for Advanced Study
November 2, 2010

Let $f(x_1,...,x_n)$ be a low degree polynomial over $F_p$. I will prove that there always exists a small set $S$ of variables, such that `most` Fourier coefficients of $f$ contain some variable from the set $S$. As an application, we will get a derandomized sampling of elements in $F_p^n$ which `look uniform` to $f$.

The talk will be self contained, even though in spirit it is a continuation of my previous talk on pseudorandom generators for $CC0[p]$. Based on joint work with Amir Shpilka and Partha Mukhopadhyay.

Shimura Varieties, Local Models and Geometric Realizations of Langlands Correspondences

Elena Mantovan
California Institute of Technology; Member, School of Mathematics
November 1, 2010

I will introduce Shimura varieties and discuss the role they play in the conjectural relashionship between Galois representations and automorphic forms. I will explain what is meant by a geometric realization of Langlands correspondences, and how the geometry of Shimura varieties and their local models conjecturally explains many aspects of these correspondences. This talk is intended as an introduction for non-number theorists to an approach to Langlands conjectures via arithmetic algebraic geometry.

The Mathematical Truth

Enrico Bombieri
Institute for Advanced Study
October 29, 2010

In this lecture, Enrico Bombieri, IBM von Neumann Professor in the School of

Mathematics, attempts to give an idea of the numerous different notions of truth in mathematics. Using accessible examples, he explains the difference between truth, proof, and verification. Bombieri, one of the world’s leading authorities on number theory and analysis, was awarded the Fields Medal in 1974 for his work on the large sieve and its application to the distribution of prime numbers. Some of his work has potential practical applications to cryptography and security of data transmission and identification.

Metaphors in Systolic Geometry

Larry Guth
University of Toronto; Institute for Advanced Study
October 18, 2010

The systolic inequality says that if we take any metric on an n-dimensional torus with volume 1, then we can find a non-contractible curve in the torus with length at most C(n). A remarkable feature of the inequality is how general it is: it holds for all metrics.

Potential Automorphy

Richard Taylor
Institute for Advanced Study
October 4, 2010

I will introduce l-adic representations and what it means for them to be automorphic, talk about potential automorphy as an alternative to automorphy, explain what can currently be proved (but not how) and discuss what seem to me the important open problems. This should serve as an introduction to half the special year for non-number theorists. The other major theme will likely be the `p-adic Langlands program', which I will not address (but perhaps someone else will).