Noncommutative probability for computer scientists

Adam Marcus
Princeton University; von Neumann Fellow, School of Mathematics
April 11, 2017
I will give an introduction to computational techniques in noncommutative probability for people (like myself) that are less interested in the details of the theory and more interested using results in the theory to help understand the behavior of things related to random matrices (asymptotically as the size of the matrices get large). This will include introducing the concept of free independence and seeing how it compares to classical independence. No prior knowledge will be assumed.

In pursuit of obfuscation

Allison Bishop
Columbia University
April 10, 2017
This talk will survey some recent advances in research on program obfuscation, an area of theoretical cryptography that has seen unprecedented levels of activity over the last four years. We will cover material starting from the basics, and no prior knowledge on obfuscation will be assumed. We will end with some open directions that should be accessible to theoreticians outside of cryptography.

Two rigid algebras and a heat kernel

Amitai Zernik
Member, School of Mathematics
April 7, 2017
Consider the Fukaya A8 algebra $E$ of $RP^{2m}$ in $CP^{2m}$ (with bulk and equivariant deformations, over the Novikov ring). On the one hand, elementary algebraic considerations show that E admis a rigid cyclic minimal model, whose structure constants encode the associated open Gromov-Witten invariants. On the other hand, in a recent paper another rigid minimal model was computed explicitly, using fixed-point localization for A8 algebras. In this talk I'll discuss these two models and explain how to use the heat kernel on $RP^{2m}$ to relate them.

Basic loci of Shimura varieties

Xuhua He
University of Maryland; von Neumann Fellow, School of Mathematics
April 6, 2017

In mod-$p$ reductions of modular curves, there is a finite set of supersingular points and its open complement corresponding to ordinary elliptic curves. In the study of mod-$p$ reductions of more general Shimura varieties, there is a "Newton stratification" decomposing the reduction into finitely many locally closed subsets, of which exactly one is closed. This closed set is called the basic locus; it recovers the supersingular locus in the classical case of modular curves.

On Zimmer's conjecture

Sebastian Hurtado-Salazar
University of Chicago
April 6, 2017

The group $\mathrm{SL}_n(\mathbb Z)$ (when $n > 2$) is very rigid, for example, Margulis proved all its linear representations come from representations of $\mathrm{SL}_n(\mathbb R)$ and are as simple as one can imagine. Zimmer's conjecture states that certain "non-linear" representations ( group actions by diffeomorphisms on a closed manifold) come also from simple algebraic constructions.