Existence of infinitely many minimal hypersurfaces in closed manifolds

Antoine Song
Princeton University
October 23, 2018
In the early 80’s, Yau conjectured that in any closed 3-manifold there should be infinitely many minimal surfaces. I will review previous contributions to the question and present a proof of the conjecture, which builds on min-max methods developed by F. C. Marques and A. Neves. A key step is the construction by min-max theory of a sequence of closed minimal surfaces in a manifold N with non-empty stable boundary, and I will explain how to achieve this via the construction of a non-compact cylindrical manifold.

New Results in Tests of Gravity with Radio Pulsars

Michael Kramer
Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy
October 23, 2018

We are living in a golden era for testing gravitational physics with precision experiments. This talk will present new results using a variety of tests with radio pulsars. These results will be placed in context of other experiments (including LIGO, EHT etc), and I will demonstrate how pulsars continue to provide unique constraints on gravity and fundamental physics in general, and how they complement other methods.

Approximating the edit distance to within a constant factor in truly subquadratic time.

Mike Saks
Rutgers University
October 22, 2018
Edit distance is a widely used measure of similarity of two strings based on the minimum number of character insertions, deletions, and substitutions required to transform one string into the other. The edit distance can be computed exactly using a classical dynamic programming algorithm that runs in quadratic time.

New and old results in the classical theory of minimal and constant mean curvature surfaces in Euclidean 3-space R^3

Bill Meeks
University of Massachusetts Amherst
October 22, 2018
In this talk I will present a survey of some of the famous results and examples in the classical theory of minimal and constant mean curvature surfaces in R^3. The first examples of minimal surfaces were found by Euler (catenoid) around 1741, Muesner (helicoid) around 1746 and Riemann (Riemann minimal examples) around 1860. The classical examples of non-zero constant mean curvature surfaces are the Delaunay surfaces of revolution found in 1841, which include round spheres and cylinders.

Asymptotic spectra and their applications II

Jeroen Zuiddam
Member, School of Mathematics
October 16, 2018
These two talks will introduce the asymptotic rank and asymptotic subrank of tensors and graphs - notions that are key to understanding basic questions in several fields including algebraic complexity theory, information theory and combinatorics.

Matrix rank is well-known to be multiplicative under the Kronecker product, additive under the direct sum, normalized on identity matrices and non-increasing under multiplying from the left and from the right by any matrices. In fact, matrix rank is the only real matrix parameter with these four properties.

Proto-Neutron Star Winds: Supernova Diversity, Magnetars, and Heavy Element Nucleosynthesis

Todd Thompson
Ohio State University & Institute for Advanced Study
October 16, 2018

The mechanism of the explosion of massive stars remains uncertain. I will
discuss aspects of the critical condition for explosion, the observed
supernova diversity, and the connection to gamma-ray bursts and
super-luminous supernovae. I will focus on the first few seconds after
explosion, during the "proto-neutron star" cooling epoch, when a wind
driven by neutrino heating emerges from the cooling neutron star into the
overlying massive stellar progenitor, powering the explosion. I will