Lectures by Faculty

Around the Davenport-Heilbronn Function

Enrico Bombieri
Institute for Advanced Study
November 10, 2011

The Davenport-Heilbronn function (introduced by Titchmarsh) is a linear combination of the two L-functions with a complex character mod 5, with a functional equation of L-function type but for which the analogue of the Riemann hypothesis fails. In this lecture, we study the Moebius inversion for functions of this type and show how its behavior is related to the distribution of zeros in the half-plane of absolute convergence. Work in collaboration with Amit Ghosh.

Education and Equality

Danielle Allen, UPS Foundation Professor
Institute for Advanced Study
November 16, 2011

Current educational policy discussions frequently invoke “equality” as the reigning ideal. But how clear a view do we have of what we mean by this? What exactly are we trying to achieve? In this lecture, Danielle Allen, UPS Foundation Professor in the School of Social Science, revisits the question of how to understand the ideal of equality in the context of educational policy.

Knots and Quantum Theory

Edward Witten, Charles Simonyi Professor
Institute for Advanced Study
October 28, 2011

A knot is more or less what you think it is—a tangled mess of string in ordinary three-dimensional space. In the twentieth century, mathematicians developed a rich and deep theory of knots. And surprisingly, as Edward Witten, Charles Simonyi Professor in the School of Natural Sciences, explains in this lecture, it turned out that many of the most interesting ideas about knots have their roots in quantum physics.