Gender Bias in Science: Where It Is and Where It Isn’t

Gender Bias in Science: Where It Is and Where It Isn’t - Shulamit Kahn

Shulamit Kahn
Boston University
April 20, 2017
Gender Bias in Science: Where It Is and Where It Isn’t
Shulamit (Shu) Kahn has been studying women in STEM disciplines for two decades, analyzing empirical evidence about salaries, promotions, and occupations. Her approach is to let the data form her opinions, rather than vice versa. In this talk, Kahn will present evidence and lead a discussion on how gender stereotypes and attitudes about math and science are learned in kindergarten, and concretized during puberty, and how those stereotypes can affect careers. She will also bring evidence on gender differences in math/STEM ability and gender bias (or lack thereof) in education, academic careers, and salaries. Kahn’s conclusions might surprise you (since many surprised her). She is asking attendees to take the Harvard Implicit Attitudes Test on Gender-Science and will bring CVs that were part of a test of gender bias to evaluate.
Prior to attending, Kahn would like attendees to take the Harvard Gender-Science Implicit Association Test available through Harvard’s Project Implicit website at: https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/takeatest.html
Guests are welcome to purchase lunch in the Dining Hall at 12:00 p.m. and convene in the Dilworth Room before the program begins at 12:30 p.m. Kahn will be available for further discussion at teatime.
The Speaker Series on Diversity aims to engage the Institute for Advanced Study community in discussions on social and cultural topics through an interdisciplinary lens. Invited speakers will share their research efforts, experiences, and perspectives, with a particular emphasis on diversity and inclusion.
The series is cosponsored by the Institute’s Committee on Diversity and Academic Affairs.