Peaks, Exclusion, and BAO

Tobias Baldauf
September 24, 2015
The interpretation of low-redshift galaxy surveys is more complicated than the interpretation of CMB temperature anisotropies. First, the matter distribution evolves nonlinearly at low redshift, limiting the use of perturbative methods. Secondly, we observe galaxies, rather than the underlying matter field. Fortunately, considerable progress has been made in understanding the large-scale structure of galaxies. A key insight has been that galaxies form in bound structures called halos, whose statistics (e.g.

Overview - AK

Andrey Kravtsov
September 25, 2015
The interpretation of low-redshift galaxy surveys is more complicated than the interpretation of CMB temperature anisotropies. First, the matter distribution evolves nonlinearly at low redshift, limiting the use of perturbative methods. Secondly, we observe galaxies, rather than the underlying matter field. Fortunately, considerable progress has been made in understanding the large-scale structure of galaxies. A key insight has been that galaxies form in bound structures called halos, whose statistics (e.g.

Halo Assembly Bias on Galaxy Cluster Scales

Surhud More
September 25, 2015
The interpretation of low-redshift galaxy surveys is more complicated than the interpretation of CMB temperature anisotropies. First, the matter distribution evolves nonlinearly at low redshift, limiting the use of perturbative methods. Secondly, we observe galaxies, rather than the underlying matter field. Fortunately, considerable progress has been made in understanding the large-scale structure of galaxies. A key insight has been that galaxies form in bound structures called halos, whose statistics (e.g.

Assembly Bias as a Challenge to Infering the Galaxy-Dark Matter Connection

Andrew Zentner
September 25, 2015
The interpretation of low-redshift galaxy surveys is more complicated than the interpretation of CMB temperature anisotropies. First, the matter distribution evolves nonlinearly at low redshift, limiting the use of perturbative methods. Secondly, we observe galaxies, rather than the underlying matter field. Fortunately, considerable progress has been made in understanding the large-scale structure of galaxies. A key insight has been that galaxies form in bound structures called halos, whose statistics (e.g.

Quantitative Constraints on Assembly Bias: An Open-Source Approach with Halotools

Andrew Hearin
September 25, 2015
The interpretation of low-redshift galaxy surveys is more complicated than the interpretation of CMB temperature anisotropies. First, the matter distribution evolves nonlinearly at low redshift, limiting the use of perturbative methods. Secondly, we observe galaxies, rather than the underlying matter field. Fortunately, considerable progress has been made in understanding the large-scale structure of galaxies. A key insight has been that galaxies form in bound structures called halos, whose statistics (e.g.

Emulating Non-Linear Clustering

Jeremy Tinker
September 25, 2015
The interpretation of low-redshift galaxy surveys is more complicated than the interpretation of CMB temperature anisotropies. First, the matter distribution evolves nonlinearly at low redshift, limiting the use of perturbative methods. Secondly, we observe galaxies, rather than the underlying matter field. Fortunately, considerable progress has been made in understanding the large-scale structure of galaxies. A key insight has been that galaxies form in bound structures called halos, whose statistics (e.g.

Modelling the 1H Term

Frank van den Bosch
September 25, 2015
The interpretation of low-redshift galaxy surveys is more complicated than the interpretation of CMB temperature anisotropies. First, the matter distribution evolves nonlinearly at low redshift, limiting the use of perturbative methods. Secondly, we observe galaxies, rather than the underlying matter field. Fortunately, considerable progress has been made in understanding the large-scale structure of galaxies. A key insight has been that galaxies form in bound structures called halos, whose statistics (e.g.

What is the Main Driver of Quenching?

Ying Zu
September 25, 2015
The interpretation of low-redshift galaxy surveys is more complicated than the interpretation of CMB temperature anisotropies. First, the matter distribution evolves nonlinearly at low redshift, limiting the use of perturbative methods. Secondly, we observe galaxies, rather than the underlying matter field. Fortunately, considerable progress has been made in understanding the large-scale structure of galaxies. A key insight has been that galaxies form in bound structures called halos, whose statistics (e.g.

Overview - US

Uros Seljak
September 25, 2015
The interpretation of low-redshift galaxy surveys is more complicated than the interpretation of CMB temperature anisotropies. First, the matter distribution evolves nonlinearly at low redshift, limiting the use of perturbative methods. Secondly, we observe galaxies, rather than the underlying matter field. Fortunately, considerable progress has been made in understanding the large-scale structure of galaxies. A key insight has been that galaxies form in bound structures called halos, whose statistics (e.g.