Math

School of Mathematics

Lectures on Homological Mirror Symmetry

Nick Sheridan
Institute for Advanced Study; Member, School of Mathematics
April 14, 2014

Lectures on Homological Mirror Symmetry

Nick Sheridan
Institute for Advanced Study; Member, School of Mathematics
March 10, 2014

Lectures on Homological Mirror Symmetry

Nick Sheridan
Institute for Advanced Study; Member, School of Mathematics
March 3, 2014

Lectures on Homological Mirror Symmetry

Nick Sheridan
Institute for Advanced Study; Member, School of Mathematics
February 24, 2014

Duality and emergent gauge symmetry

Nathan Seiberg
Institute for Advanced Study; Faculty, School of Natural Science
February 20, 2014

A new look at the Jones polynomial of a knot

Edward Witten
Institute for Advanced Study; Faculty, School of Natural Science
February 20, 2014

Arithmetic hyperbolic 3-manifolds, perfectoid spaces, and Galois representations III

Peter Scholze
University of Bonn
February 14, 2014
One of the most studied objects in mathematics is the modular curve, which is the quotient of hyperbolic 2-space by the action of \(\mathrm{SL}_2(\mathbb Z)\). It is naturally the home of modular forms, but it also admits an algebraic structure. The interplay of these structures lies at the heart of the Langlands correspondence for \(\mathrm{GL}_2/\mathbb Q\), connecting modular forms with Galois representations. The natural generalizations of the modular curve to higher dimension are the arithmetic locally symmetric spaces.

Arithmetic hyperbolic 3-manifolds, perfectoid spaces, and Galois representations II

Peter Scholze
University of Bonn
February 12, 2014
One of the most studied objects in mathematics is the modular curve, which is the quotient of hyperbolic 2-space by the action of \(\mathrm{SL}_2(\mathbb Z)\). It is naturally the home of modular forms, but it also admits an algebraic structure. The interplay of these structures lies at the heart of the Langlands correspondence for \(\mathrm{GL}_2/\mathbb Q\), connecting modular forms with Galois representations. The natural generalizations of the modular curve to higher dimension are the arithmetic locally symmetric spaces.

Lectures on Homological Mirror Symmetry

Nick Sheridan
Institute for Advanced Study; Member, School of Mathematics
February 10, 2014