Univalent Foundations: New Foundations of Mathematics

Vladimir Voevodsky
Institute for Advanced Study; Faculty, School of Mathematics
March 26, 2014
In Voevodsky’s experience, the work of a mathematician is 5% creative insight and 95% self-verification. Moreover, the more original the insight, the more one has to pay for it later in self-verification work. The Univalent Foundations project, started at the Institute a few years ago, aims to lower the price by giving mathematicians the ability to verify their constructions with the help of computers.

Art History Lecture Series, Orientations in Renaissance Art

Alexander Nagel
New York University
December 9, 2013
In this lecture, Alexander Nagel, Professor of Fine Arts at the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, illustrates some ways in which art produced during the Renaissance period points ­eastward towards Constantinople, towards the Holy Land, and to places further east, even as far as China. Nagel focuses on the forms this "orientation" took between 1492-1507, years during which new lands were being discovered, to great fanfare, but were still believed to belong to the continent of Asia.

What's Next?

Nathan Seiberg
Professor, School of Natural Sciences
December 4, 2013
In recent decades, physicists and astronomers have discovered two beautiful Standard Models, one for the quantum world of extremely short distances, and one for the universe as a whole. Both models have had spectacular success, but there are also strong arguments for new physics beyond these models. In this lecture, Nathan Seiberg, Professor in the School of Natural Sciences, reviews these models, their successes, and their shortfalls.

Rethinking Barbarian Invasions through Genomic History

Patrick Geary
School of Historical Studies
November 13, 2013
Historians have debated for centuries the magnitude, nature, and impact of population movements from the borders of the Roman Empire into its heart between the fourth and seventh centuries. In recent years, geneticists have begun to attempt to provide clarity to these questions through the analysis of the biological data contained in the human genome.

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